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An Explanation Of "Mass Formation Psychosis"

Mass formation psychosis
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EDITOR'S NOTE: When mass opinion is bitterly divided by a “truth” fundamental to principle and policy, then the problems to follow can be quite severe. As the recent political and pandemic landscapes have shown us, a lack of reliable measures for “truth” can destroy not only the foundation of democracy but our fundamental perception of reality. It would be simple to say that scientifically-derived evidence is adequate enough to prove a fact that falls under the domain of science. But even that’s contestable, as the interpretation of evidence, cherry-picked or not, can easily change the nature of that evidence. Whether you believe that American democracy is under threat, what’s certain is that the fundamental “reality” underlying democracy certainly is. Mass formation psychosis may simply be the wrong term to describe what's really happening here: as German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche once said, there are cases where no absolute truth exists. Instead, there may be several incompatible truths to consider. Each one, a social and political powder keg.

Well, butter my buns and call me a biscuit… if this ain’t the biggest revealing tell in years.

Apparently Big Tech and big propaganda media, Reuters and the Associated Press, have joined together to refute the concept of “Mass Formation Psychosis”, and pushed their collective narrative into the narrative engineering system:

The Associated Press – SEE HERE and Reuters – SEE HERE, quickly rush to the “fact check” typeset to stop people from recognizing what is most likely the cause of their own psychosis.   In a world where things are no longer shocking, this is, well, a little shocking, in a weird and seemingly Orwellian kind of way.

Yes Alice, the same “experts” and media who are credibly accused of creating/enabling the mass formation psychosis would like to assure us that no such reality exists.  This is almost too funny.

(AP) – […] “The concept has no academic credibility,” Stephen Reicher, a social psychology professor at the University of St Andrews in the U.K., wrote in an email to The Associated Press.  The term also does not appear in the American Psychological Association’s Dictionary of Psychology.

“Psychosis” is a term that refers to conditions that involve some disconnect from reality. According to a National Institutes of Health estimate, about 3% of people experience some form of psychosis at some time in their lives.

[…]  The description of “mass formation psychosis” offered by Malone resembles discredited concepts, such as “mob mentality” and “group mind,” according to John Drury, a social psychologist at the University of Sussex in the U.K. who studies collective behavior. The ideas suggest that “when people form part of a psychological crowd they lose their identities and their self-control; they become suggestible, and primitive instinctive impulses predominate,” he said in an email.

That notion has been discredited by decades of research on crowd behavior, Drury said. “No respectable psychologist agrees with these ideas now,” he said.

Multiple experts told the AP that while there is evidence that groups can shape or influence one’s behaviors — and that people can and do believe falsehoods that are put forward by the leader of a group — those concepts do not involve the masses experiencing “psychosis” or “hypnosis.” (read more)

Reuters offers this simultaneous rebuttal:

(Reuters) – “Mass formation psychosis” is not an academic term recognized in the field of psychology, nor is there evidence of any such phenomenon occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic, multiple experts in crowd psychology have told Reuters.

[…] There is no evidence to suggest a “mass formation psychosis” has occurred during the pandemic, experts told Reuters. The term itself is not recognised among academics, and modern research into crowd psychology has shown that crowds do not behave in mindless or non-individualistic ways. (more)

Once a collective group creates an alternate reality of itself, in this case a totalitarian reality based on government needing to create an irrational illusion of fear that becomes part of the accepted national identity, how can anyone call attention to the outcomes without finding themselves in front of the board of inquisition who organizes the collective?

Put another way… if the pod under your bed malfunctioned, but the pods under all the other beds in the city worked, what happens when you awaken and realize you are not one of them, but you must engage in the world of them while looking for others -like yourself- whose pods hopefully malfunctioned?   That is the current challenge for anyone trying to communicate on contrary evidence and yet avoid the ire from the collective board of COVID compliance who have successfully brainwashed the audience.

As a rather prescient Lewis Carroll shared so brilliantly in his novel of Alice, Through The Looking Glass:

“If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?”

So here we are.

Cheers !

Photo: The Conservative Tree House

Originally posted on The Conservative Tree House.

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