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Banker Sentenced For Stealing From Man With Dementia

Banker Stealing
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EDITOR NOTE: Shocking, despicable, and perfectly representative of bank culture, Comerica banker Marie Fulle possessed the rarest kind of moral deficiency to steal a million dollars from an elderly man suffering from dementia. How she did it is detailed in the article below. Comerica will describe this as an anomalous event, and they’d be “correct” but not in the way they’d want you to believe. You see, Fulle’s tactics were so unsophisticated, they’re undeserving of the criminal ingenuity typically associated with most banks (except for Wells Fargo’s big scandal, which comes close). Bank’s have legal ways to get their hands on your money--such as hiding clauses that are favorable to banks yet exploitative of customers in their disclosures and customer agreements. Though Fulle’s actions didn’t match the kind of ingenuity you’d expect from such institutions, it did, however, match the culture of greed that permeates through the entire banking system.

A former branch manager of a Southern California bank was sentenced Monday to more than three years in prison for stealing $1 million from a customer with dementia, federal prosecutors said.

Marie Fulle, 38, pleaded guilty in September 2019 to two counts of bank fraud, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said in a statement.

Fulle cultivated an “exclusive banking relationship” with the older man at the Comerica branch in Tustin, south of Los Angeles, according to prosecutors.

“Fulle then opened various bank accounts with the victim and used them to create a confusing web in which she could hide unauthorized transfers, and forged withdrawals with cashier’s checks,” the statement said.

She handled the victim's banking transactions in private, away from cameras and other bank employees, prosecutors said.

Fulle spent the money on trips and luxury items, including jewelry, according to investigators.

She was ordered to pay $1.1 million in restitution.

Originally posted Sacramento Bee

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