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Labor Shortage Impact: Companies Avoiding Drug Testing

Drug Testing
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EDITOR NOTE: A recent study shows that an unforeseen trend is happening due to the worldwide labor shortage. Complex reports that according to a survey by the staffing firm ManpowerGroup, 4,050 companies (about 9% of the 43-country survey) say they are eliminating drug testing to “attract and retain in-demand talent.” Pro-cannabis groups are hailing this as a victory, although it also means that other, more dangerous drugs will not be tested for either, which could be a health and safety issue for companies moving forward. Amazon is one of the major U.S. corporations leading this charge as well as lobbying the U.S. government to legalize marijuana.

Employers around the world are starting to get rid of drug testing in an effort to entice more prospective applicants in the wake of a global labor shortage, according to a report from Vice.

Staffing firm ManpowerGroup released a survey showing that out of more than 45,000 employers from 43 countries, nine percent, or around 4,050, have admitted to eliminating drug testing to “attract and retain in-demand talent.” 

“The global talent shortage shows no sign of slowing, with 69 percent of employers reporting difficulty filling roles,” the survey’s executive summary reads. “The employment outlook is optimistic, particularly for employers that are prepared to adapt to a new world of work and offer incentives to attract and retain the talent they need.”

This course change on drug testing comes months after online shopping giant Amazon announced a change to its own policy, removing marijuana from the company’s screening program. Amazon voiced its support in an open letter to lawmakers earlier this month for the Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, and later pushed for the passing of the Cannabis Administration and Opportunity Act, arguing that such a provision “will open significant new economic opportunities for millions of capable individuals.”

Employers around the world are starting to get rid of drug testing in an effort to entice more prospective applicants in the wake of a global labor shortage, according to a report from Vice.

Staffing firm ManpowerGroup released a survey showing that out of more than 45,000 employers from 43 countries, nine percent, or around 4,050, have admitted to eliminating drug testing to “attract and retain in-demand talent.” 

“The global talent shortage shows no sign of slowing, with 69 percent of employers reporting difficulty filling roles,” the survey’s executive summary reads. “The employment outlook is optimistic, particularly for employers that are prepared to adapt to a new world of work and offer incentives to attract and retain the talent they need.”

This course change on drug testing comes months after online shopping giant Amazon announced a change to its own policy, removing marijuana from the company’s screening program. Amazon voiced its support in an open letter to lawmakers earlier this month for the Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, and later pushed for the passing of the Cannabis Administration and Opportunity Act, arguing that such a provision “will open significant new economic opportunities for millions of capable individuals.”

“In the past, like many employers, we’ve disqualified people from working at Amazon if they tested positive for marijuana use,” Dave Clark, Amazon CEO of Worldwide Consumer, said. “However, given where state laws are moving across the U.S., we’ve changed course.” 

Amazon is now lobbying Congress to federally legalize cannabis. 

Original post from Complex

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