Chat with us, powered by LiveChat
Menu

Will New Repo Facilities Boost Confidence in Money Markets?

Repo Facilities
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

EDITOR NOTE: The Fed is doing everything in its power right now to manipulate financial markets and the banking sector to keep U.S. consumers confident in the economy and the power of the U.S. dollar. Their latest move is setting up two repo facilities for domestic and international banks. A spokesman for the Fed says that “The presence of these facilities should create confidence that liquidity at a backstop rate will be available in overnight money markets as needed.” It likely will create a sense of confidence among wealthy bankers getting fat off the Fed’s currency manipulation, but is it enough to keep fooling real Americans? Probably not for long. 

(Reuters) - A major lesson from the global financial crisis and from the financial shock caused by the coronavirus pandemic is that central banks should maintain the tools needed to quickly address market disruptions caused by firms facing immediate liquidity needs, a senior official for the New York Federal Reserve said on Wednesday.

Two facilities established by the Fed last month, including a domestic standing repo facility (SRF) and a repo facility for foreign and international monetary authorities, should serve that role and help markets function smoothly during times of stress, said Lorie Logan, an executive vice president in the Markets Group at the New York Fed and the manager of the System Open Market Account.

“The presence of these facilities should create confidence that liquidity at a backstop rate will be available in overnight money markets as needed, potentially limiting the demand for precautionary liquidity and the run-like dynamics that can occur,” Logan said.

The domestic standing repo facility, with a minimum bid rate of 0.25%, should help to keep the effective federal funds rate from spiking above the Fed’s target range, Logan said.

In some circumstances, markets will calm down from the knowledge that the Fed is willing to provide future support as needed through emergency measures, Logan said. But such announcement effects may not be as strong when there is an immediate need for U.S. dollars, she said.

Original post from Reuters

All articles are provided as a third party analysis and do not necessarily reflect the explicit views of GSI Exchange and should not be construed as financial advice.

Precious Metals and Currency Data Powered by nFusion Solutions